Reaction Jackson

by Corey

Maybe I’m missing it, so I blame myself, but it seems to me that that there is far more reaction about an overreaction than an overreaction.

The Sabres had a complete collapse against the Nashville Predators on Sunday night, turning a 3-1 third period lead into a 4-3 overtime loss. Long term, the loss did about as little damage as you could hope for against the Sabres playoff chances. If any reaction was to be had it was about the state of the team psychologically than the state of the team statistically.

Twitter has quickly become a staple for the technologically savvy fan of the Sabres. The “sabres-game” list started by WGR’s Jeremy White has turned from an interesting idea to an avenue for a fan base wide conversation that takes place in real time. About 180 people tweeting, with almost 500 people following on twitter and who knows how many reading without owning a twitter account. The list provides an interesting cross-section of fans across the fan base.

A bit of a spat broke out following the loss on Sunday. Folks were upset at the loss (doesn’t that make sense?) and took the opportunity to bring a little pain to their keyboards and your monitors. If your team loses a game in the way the Sabres did, you might feel some conflicted emotions. You might even take the Lord’s name in vain. In that moment, where Twitter lives, I can forgive those who spout off or release a bit of frustration. You can review the list yourself and chart the course of the conversation. It seems to me that those who are upset and down on the team are outnumbered by those who are telling them to mellow out by 5-1. Outrage at the outrage, so to speak.

Now, Twitter is a different animal. It isn’t just any conversation because it is a written conversation. It’s harder to detect sarcasm, nuance, and seriousness. Beyond that, the whole point is to make yourself heard to large amounts of people, so it is natural that everyone with a thought would want to pipe in, and sometimes those thoughts are repetitive. People can end up writing over each other while at the same time going off half-cocked. Common sense and clear thought require patience and reflection, and Twitter is setup for the opposite of that.

With that in mind, instead of getting our ire on against our fellow fans for spouting off, perhaps a deep breath is required. I mean, for Christ’s sake, the whole point of Twitter is short, real time interactions. Twitter is not where people go to think. People get away from Twitter to do that.

We still don’t grasp the process. We don’t understand that that less time we give ourselves to think the more prone we are to say things we’d rather correct later. There isn’t a grain of salt to be found out there.

Given how often people use it, it amazes me that we still don’t quite understand how this thing works.

6 Comments

  1. “Common sense and clear thought require patience and reflection, and Twitter is setup for the opposite of that.” “Twitter is not where people go to think.”

    If a fan has a right to vent, the beautiful thing about twitter is I have a right to make fun of that venting. If one person decides to use Twitter as a place to **not think**, I in turn have a right to use it as a place to **think** about what others say.

    More broadly, I utilize Twitter to actually expand my horizons. I enjoy getting different perspectives. Hive-mind and all that. Why use something if it’s not going to change your perspective? If you’re a person that uses Twitter to tell everyone about your chicken sandwich, are you really getting the most out of it?

    Call me curmudgeonly, but perhaps we do too much expressing and not enough listening.

    • Corey

      “but perhaps we do too much expressing and not enough listening.”

      Strongly agree.

      Also, I think I want to draw the line between teasing and being indignant. I think people should be held responsible for what they say on Twitter for sure, but we should also allow for the possibility that people are reacting rather than thinking.

      I’m okay with letting people react, I think we should just be aware that Twitter can be more of an emotional outburst than a well reasoned thesis.

      Did I just contradict myself when I said strongly agree? I’m sorry.

  2. Yeah, but if you think people need to stop reacting to the people reacting to the game, how come you don’t need to stop reacting to the people reacting to the people reacting to the game? And now, to make matters worse, here I am reacting to you reacting to the people reacting to the people reacting to the game.

    Everything is stupid. 😛

  3. CDR

    “Given how often people use it, it amazes me that we still don’t quite understand how this thing works.”

    Are you talking about twitter? The internet? The human brain?